Sunday, November 18, 2007

NICE TO SEE

I know that many bosses read this blog..

I live in the 18th dist and I called the police to report a loud party on a busy friday night. the police showed up in less then 5 mins and shut the party down and restored peace.

I was unable to see the beat that showed up. but they did a great job clearing out 100 kids in 10 mins.

I then tried to call 311 to see if I could send a message to say thanks to the officers but 311 was unable to do that. 311 then transferred me to 911 and they then sent me to 18th dist desk who then told me that they are unable to take any messages for cars on the street.. they then sent me back to 311 who told me that any words of praise would have to be official and written then sent to the headquarters ( even if I did not have the officers names) so 20 mins later I got nothing.

AGAIN ALL I WAS TRYING TO DO WAS SAY THANKS FOR A GOOD JOB.


So it seems that it's so easy to call and complain about the police. But it's so hard, dam near impossible for a citizen to praise the good work of the police.

so why can't someone make this a little easier.
In this day and age, why not let citizens call in letters of praise and let it go on the officers record. I would be willing to bet you would have a lot more praise.. then complaints

Sun Nov 18, 06:02:00 PM

17 comments:

leomemorial said...

That's what I told Phil Cline when he was Supt. The majority of departments out here have a good relationship w/civilians. And many have the dept. website set-up where you can email non-emergency problems, compiments, etc.

I hate to say this but the CPD is very non-civilian friendly. When I went to the 2nd candlelight ceremony, I had people from the CTA bus driver to fellow athletes working out asking me what was going on w/so many cops? Then some were upset, because had they known about this, they would have attended to pay their respects.

Why is it that that you read about the CPD going out to certain neighborhoods and having the neighborhood/their cops for a friendly get together w/hot dogs, etc but I've never had this in my neighborhood? I'm sure that if the dept. needed donations for food, the businesses would step forward. It's our chance to thank our officers and get to know what's going on. Many of us work and cannot attend CAPS meetings.

The dept. should also make that blog for cops and civilians. It would be more effective...

Anonymous said...

Correct, so easy to beef, just call 911 and we'll send a supervisor out to take your complaint. Now departmental awards, there's another story! Some P.O.'s have been waiting well OVER 2 YEARS to receive awards for acts of heroism.
Your CR number will be issued and handled with discipline handed out within 30 days but should you do something good which SHOULD make the news (but doesn't) you can count on a couple of years wait....

Anonymous said...

Renee--

You won't get the friendly get-together with hot dogs because you probably live in a good neighborhood. No one cares what the normal working people think. They only care about the ghetto scum because the press will only listen to them.

Anonymous said...

you can now do this on line Compliment an Officer

Anonymous said...

Last New Year's Eve, I was coming home from work. It was late and the buses were on holiday service. Meaning, on the southside there was no service and it was time to walk home.

It was damp, dark, and brutally cold. Plus, there were numerous other 'element' hanging around. I was walking quickly trying to get home.

That's when I saw a Chicago Police car going past me. A rare sight in my neighborhood. As I turned to look at the car, you can see the brakelights on as the car continued to roll. Only a cop would have the talent to drive AND hit the brakes, while still rolling.

That's when the car quickly turned around in a swoop. He was busy: talking on the cell, radio and squeezing in some questions for me as to why I was wlaking this late at night. Normal questions.

We had a few minutes to talk and the warmth from the car was inviting. He followed me the short distance home.

Turns out, he was a Sergeant and his grandfather was killed in the line of duty.

The odd thing was I had prayed as I was walking to please get me home safely that crazy and cold night. You always hear the bad things about our stars, but never the good things that never hit the news. I sent him a card.

Anonymous said...

Awards? Ask Deputy Chief Michael Chasen why there are over 200 submissions for awards in his In-Box waiting for his approvel.

But I guess that his job is sooo demanding he doesn't have time for that S4!t...

Anonymous said...

Funny thing, at the OPS (now I SUCK ASS Division or something), you can either complain about an officer or compliment an officer. Of course that compliment an officer section doesn't get as much play.

Anonymous said...

i think that people are too busy to write and send a letter.. i have a few things I would like to thank the police for, but don't have time.. ..this is the age of the computer and phone.

you are right SCS
good post...

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Anonymous said...

hey LEOMEMORIAL...I wish all the civilians could be like you..
this city would be a much better place...

Anonymous said...

thank you to officer brittain at the orange line. he's more knowledgable then the cta there and much better customer service. he's also very tough and keep a tight lid on things there. i tried looking at the police website, but see nothing to send this to there. when my uncle & i went downtown, he was there. i was very proud to introduce my uncle to him.

Anonymous said...

Don't go bothering Chasen. Between weekly massages, tanning and manicures (have you seen the shine on his nails? wow!), he doesn't have time for approving any awards! I've heard that he is about the most arrogant, rude SOB within the exempt ranks. He wears some pretty nice gold wristlets, though, usually on the left hand.

Anonymous said...

Believe it or not, even in some of the so-called "ghetto" communities, the block clubs and neighbors involved in CAPS have provided hot dogs and refreshments for the officers who patrol their neighborhoodsat some of the scheduled outdoor roll calls. You just don't hear about it as much, but I've seen it happen. Not everyone who is growing up poor or in impoverished communities hates the police. Clearly, the criminal element have their own agenda (and they always will), but we have to work a little harder to reach the good, working people in those commmunities who quietly support us, even come out as witnesses for us when the bad guys try to put a case on US. Riding around thinking that "they" are all "bad" actually continues the spiral of contempt and mistrust that permeates a lot of the public. It's not always easy reaching out in some of the communities, forming bonds where we can, but when the shit hits the fan, those bonds are useful. It's always easier on our side to simply blanket all of "them" in a negative light, but it's also very counterproductive, and I think we're all seeing that now.

Anonymous said...

To the poster about Officer Brittain on the Orange Line--

Please send your letter to:

Commander D. RAYL
Public Transportation Unit
Chicago Police Department
1718 S. State St.
Chicago, Illinois 60616

I agree with your assessment.

Anonymous said...

Sat Nov 24, 08:01:00 AM

thank you very much. i will do that. he's incredible.

Anonymous said...

Had to wait 3 years for my DC.Got 4more submitted and approved.Should get the last one in 2019.

Anonymous said...

It took me a while to find it (go figure), but here's the link to COMPLIMENT AN OFFICER:
http://www.opschicago.org/howtocompliment.html

Please pass it around to friends and neighbors. We need a morale boost. Thanks.

Please keep in mind that this is an open blog
that can and is read by people other than Chicago Police Officers.